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Havrix product overview

What Havrix is and what it is used for

Havrix Monodose and Havrix Junior Monodose are vaccines containing Hepatitis A virus. It is used to boost the body’s immune system to stop infection from Hepatitis A.

What is the Hepatitis A virus?

Hepatitis A virus causes an infection of the liver.

You can catch the virus by eating or drinking contaminated food or water.

The virus is present in the bowel movement (motion) of infected people, even when they may have no signs of the infection.

You can catch Hepatitis A infection in any country but the risk is highest in places and countries where sanitation and food and water hygiene are poor.

After exposure to the hepatitis A virus, it may take 2 to 6 weeks before symptoms develop.

Some people have the virus and never get ill but they can still infect other people during this time.

Signs of Hepatitis A

The main signs of the illness include sickness, yellowing of the skin and eyes (jaundice), fever and headache.

Recovery from symptoms following infection may be slow and take several weeks or months.

They may not be able to drink alcohol and may need to avoid certain foods according to their doctor’s advice.

Severe complications are very rare but sometimes the liver stops working and hospital care is needed until the infection gets better.
 

How Havrix works

Within Havrix Monodose and Havrix Junior Monodose the virus is not alive so these vaccines cannot cause Hepatitis A infection.

When you are given Havrix Monodose or Havrix Junior Monodose your body will make antibodies (the body’s natural defence system) against the Hepatitis A virus.

After two to four weeks, these antibodies will have been produced and will protect you against Hepatitis A infection.

How Havrix is given

Havrix Monodose

Havrix Monodose (1 ml) is injected into the muscle in the upper arm.

The first dose of vaccine should protect you from infection with Hepatitis A virus within two to four weeks after the injection.

Protection should last for at least one year.

To ensure long term protection, you should receive a second (booster) vaccination 6 to 12 months after your first dose. As long as you receive the booster within five years, you should still be fully protected. Once you have had your booster vaccination, you are not expected to need an additional dose of Havrix.

Havrix Junior Monodose

A single dose of Havrix Junior Monodose 0.5 ml is injected into the muscle in the upper arm.

The first dose of vaccine should protect your child from infection with Hepatitis A virus within two to four weeks.

Protection should last for at least one year.

To ensure long term protection, your child should receive a second (booster) vaccination six to twelve months after their first dose. As long as the booster is given within three years, they should still be fully protected. Once the booster vaccination is given, they are not expected to need an additional dose of Havrix.
For further information on Havrix Monodose and Havrix Junior Monodose please see:


Havrix Monodose Patient Information Leaflet (PIL)

Havrix Junior Monodose Patient Information Leaflet (PIL)

If you experience any side effects, talk to your doctor, pharmacist or nurse. This includes any side effects not listed in the package leaflet. You can also report side effects directly via the Yellow Card Scheme at http://mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard.
By reporting side effects you can help provide more information on the safety of this medicine.

Havrix is a registered trademark of the GlaxoSmithKline Group of Companies