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Living with my asthma

This page is specifically for patients who have been prescribed Relvar Ellipta. If you are not a patient please return to the public website.

What is asthma?

Asthma is a condition that affects the airways - the small tubes that carry air in and out of the lungs.

When a person with asthma comes into contact with something that irritates their airways (an asthma trigger), the muscles around the walls of the airways tighten so that the airways become narrower and the lining of the airways becomes inflamed and starts to swell. Sometimes, sticky mucus or phlegm builds up, which can further narrow the airways. These reactions cause the airways to become narrower and irritated - making it difficult to breath and leading to symptoms of asthma.

Monitoring my asthma

It is common for people to have accepted that symptoms and lifestyle limitations are normal with asthma – but with the right treatment, good control is possible for most people. Because asthma symptoms vary over time, you should take measures to monitor how well you’re doing.

The MyAsthma App allows you to create a profile, rate your asthma symptoms daily, track your scores over time, and create a PDF report that can be emailed. On top of this, it offers great asthma tips in the library as well as the pollen count, pollution and temperature in your location

Peak expiratory flow

Peak expiratory flow rate, also known as peak flow, or PEF, is a measure of the maximum speed of flow of air out of your lungs when you blow as hard as you can into a peak flow meter. This provides an indication of how well your asthma is controlled and also if your treatment is effective.
You can obtain a peak flow meter on prescription from your doctor if they agree it would be useful for you. You can then use it at home to measure your own peak flow regularly and keep a record of the results.
A fall in peak flow reading = your asthma is getting worse and could mean you are at risk of an asthma attack. If your asthma or breathing gets worse tell your doctor straight away.

What to do if you feel breathless or wheezy[1][2]

If you get these symptoms you must use a quick-acting reliever inhaler (such as salbutamol). Please remember that Relvar Ellipta should not be used to relieve a sudden attack of breathlessness or wheezing.
If you feel you are getting breathless or wheezy more often than normal, or if you are using your quick-acting inhaler more than usual, see your doctor.

References:

  1. Relvar Ellipta 92/22mg Summary of Product Characteristics (SPC)
  2. Relvar Ellipta 184/22mg Summary of Product Characteristics (SPC)

This medicine is subject to additional monitoring. This will allow quick identification of new safety information. You can help by reporting any side effects you may get. If you experience any side effects, talk to your doctor, pharmacist or nurse. This includes any side effects not listed in the package leaflet. You can also report side effects directly via the Yellow Card Scheme at www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard .
By reporting side effects you can help provide more information on the safety of this medicine.

Relvar and Ellipta are registered trademarks of the GlaxoSmithKline group of companies